Thursday, September 28, 2006

Outstanding historical movies

I am perfectly aware that what I wrote today in my blog has nothing to do with politics or other related stuff, but at least, I'd like to take the time to share with you my favourite historical movies. Obviously, the things that you need to know before you can go further are quite simple: there are absolutely no particular order and secondly and foremost, I'd like to know what are your favourite historical flicks. Don’t worry, tomorrow, you'll have my thoughts on the budget that was announced by Canada's Prime minister Stephen Harper.

Munich
Munich
For some people, Munich might definitely not be the best historical movie ever, but hopefully, despite his internationally known religious leaning, director Steven Spielberg (Saving Private Ryan) hopefully manages to present with his wonderful cinematographic vision the Palestinians and the Israelis as what they truly are, which means real human beings animated by subjective and collective desires, without glorifying their respective endeavours, hopefully. This is certainly the most violent historical movie that you'll see, but the violence, besides hitting our sensitiveness, brings us into the torn mind of the characters as they evolve.

Taegukgi: The Brotherhood of War
Taegukgi: The Brotherhood of War
It is definitely a pleasure for me to introduce you to this South Korean movie on the Korean War (1950-1953). Even though Taegukgi: The Brotherhood of War is full to the brim with American-style clichés that you have already seen in other American war movies, it does go further than its Yankee counterparts by going further into the study of the characters' psychology. Furthermore, the historical aspect of the movie is quite well exploited although certain historical elements could have been added. All in all, the movie is extremely easy to understand.

The Downfall
The Downfall
Any given enthusiastic of History should do a homework that consists into watching this terrific German movie. Some people might find it extremely hard to watch to the end, because the movie's director made the choice to present Adolf Hitler the way we're not used to see him. Hopefully, The Downfall is a historical movie that destabilizes us very easily because of its impressive neutrality. No prejudices. No made up facts. The story is well rendered thanks to the impeccable performance of the cast led by Swiss actor Bruno Ganz, as Adolf Hitler.

Hotel Rwanda
Hotel Rwanda
Although Hotel Rwanda might not necessarily help you to thoroughly understand the reprehensible genocide that took place in Rwanda back in 1994, the story, which is seen through the eyes of Paul Rusesabagina, a hotel manager who witnessed the genocide, will definitely touch you as you can't even imagine it. The movie also shows the difficulty that the UN forces had in order to guarantee stability in a land torn by ethnic tensions. It's definitely worth your time for the magnificent performance of Don Cheaddle, as Paul Rusesabagina, and Nick Nolte, as the Canadian general who is in charge of the UN forces in Rwanda.
Maurice Richard
Maurice Richard
I know that the final choice was quite hard to make, but after all, since I like hockey, I took this movie. Anyway, this account of the career of Canadian (or Quebecker, depending of your viewpoint) hockey player Maurice Richard perfectly shows the ethnic tensions that was dividing the English and the French Canadians not only in Canadian politics, but also on the skating rinks of the National Hockey League (NHL) back in the 1940s to the 1960s. The movie doesn't try to go beyond what Maurice Richard really is. Despite the fact that the story is seen through the eyes of a Quebecker, the movie doesn't present the English Canadians as monsters. All in all, this objective movie has no villains, but only one hero that is well interpreted by Roy Dupuis.

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